Vitamin B2 and Coenzyme Q10 in Migraine

4th September 2017

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): What is it and what does it do?

Vitamin B2, aka, riboflavin, is one of the body’s B vitamins. The name riboflavin comes from ‘ribose’, a sugar that forms part of the vitamin and ‘flavin’ for the yellow colour of the molecules, The word flavin comes from the Latin for yellow – Flavus.

The B vitamins help the body to convert food into fuel, which in turn gives us energy. They also help the body break down fats and proteins. B Vitamins complement and are needed for healthy skin, hair, liver and eyes. They help the nervous system function properly and B2 in particular is important for growth and the production of red blood cells.

Most of us can get the right amounts of B2 through our diets, but some people, e.g. the elderly, can be at risk of B2 deficiency because of a poor diet.

Signs that you may have a Vitamin B2 deficiency include;

  • Fatigue
  • Slowed growth
  • Digestive problems
  • Cracks and sores around the corners of the mouth
  • Swollen magenta-colored tongue
  • Eye fatigue
  • Swelling and soreness of the throat
  • Sensitivity to light

Vitamin B2 Rich Foods

Studies suggest that Vitamin B2 may reduce the frequency of Migraine and also the length of time they last. It may be more efficient when combined with other supplements for migraine such as Magnesium and Coenzyme Q10.

Like magnesium, the easiest and most efficient way for us to absorb B2 is through our foods, but it’s a sensitive vitamin. It’s destroyed by light, and can vanish if food is either soaked first, or again boiled to within the same inch of its life. B2 can also be lost through frying, so steaming or roasting are the way to go with B2 foods.

Foods rich in Vitamin B2 are:

  • Brewer’s yeast
  • Almonds
  • Offal – Yep, animal guts!!
  • Whole grains
  • Wheat germ
  • Wild rice
  • Mushrooms
  • Soybeans
  • Milk
  • Yogurt
  • Eggs
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Spinach
  • Flours and cereals are often fortified with riboflavin.

Again, the foods above in italics are potential triggers for migraines so once again, try using a migraine diary . The tyramine and gluten in some flours and cereals can have an effect on your migraine, but currently there is only anecdotal evidence to suggest a gluten-free diet can be helpful for sufferers.

66526240-Foods-Highest-in-Vitamin-B2-Riboflavin-Healthy-eating-Flat-lay-Stock-Photo

Vitamin B2 Supplements

Consult a medical profession before using the supplements below, especially if you’re pregnant or allergic to any of the ingredients! 

Riboflavin makes up a part of the B-complex supplements, but in a small dose. For Migraine, a dose of about 400 mg per day is suggested.

It comes in many forms, including tablets, capsules, sprays and liquids. You need to choose the right format for yourself as they are all absorbed at a different rate. Generally speaking though, liquids are more easily absorbed than tablets. A compromise might be capsules which are absorbed when the outer gel shell melts. Vitamin B2 is absorbed more efficiently when taken between meals.

The Down-side of Vitamin B2

Vitamin B2 is generally safe, even at high doses and doesn’t seem to cause any serious side effects. It’s regarded too as ‘likely safe’ for pregnant or breast-feeding women however you should okay this with your doctor or specialist. You may experience some of the following symptoms if taking a B2 supplement;

  • Itching
  • Numbness
  • Burning or prickling sensations
  • Yellow or orange urine
  • Sensitivity to light

It can also interact with medications that you are taking for migraine as well as for other disorders or health problems.

Several types of medications interact with Vitamin B2 supplements or affect the absorption in the body. If you take any of the following types of medication see your GP or specialist before taking Vitamin B2

  • Anticholinergicthese are used for gastrointestinal spasms, asthma, depression, and motion sickness.
  • Tetracyclineantibiotic drugs used for acne, cholera, etc
  • Tricyclic antidepressantsused to treat depression and migraine, including Amitriptyline (Elavil) and Nortriptyline (Pamelor)
  • Antipsychotic medicationsthese are mainly used to treat depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, etc
  • Doxorubicindrugs used for the treatment of certain cancers.
  • Methotrexatedrugs used to treat cancer and some autoimmune diseases
  • Probenecidthese increase the production of urine and are used for gout

 

Coenzyme Q10: what is it and what does it do?

Coenzyme Q 10, also known as Ubiquinol/Ubiquinone, but from here on called CoQ10 as I’m feeling lazy, is a substance that’s like a vitamin. It helps your body’s cells produce energy and also protects it from toxins, so it has an antioxidant property too.

It was first discovered in 1957 by a man called Frederick Crane at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Enzyme Institute, followed quickly by people working for pharmaceutical company Merck, Sharp and Dohme (MSD) in 1958. In the 70s it was found that a deficiency in CoQ10 was associated with heart disease and now it is used to help several different conditions, including migraine. It’s thought that it has an effect on nerve pain and as a result on migraine, however, more tests are needed to absolutely prove this.

It’s found in plenty of foods but our levels of CoQ10 diminish over time. The suggested dose of CoQ10 is 100 – 150mg per day. Some of us are more prone to deficiency than others and although it’s regarded as rare, some of the signs that you may have a CoQ10 deficiency include;

  • Physical and mental fatigue
  • Chronic pain
  • Weak immune system
  • Increased risk of heart disease
  • Obesity
  • Neurological Disorders

CoQ10 Rich Foods

CoQ10 helps produce energy and neutralises harmful toxins. When you have enough in your system it can help protect all the body’s cells, reducing your risk of developing chronic diseases. The body produces some CoQ10 on its own, but you can get more from your diet.

Frying once again reduces CoQ10 so steaming and roasting are the best way to preserve the enzyme.

Foods rich in Vitamin B2 are:

  • Offal – Yep guts again!
  • Beef
  • Pork
  • Chicken
  • Strawberries
  • Apples
  • Grapes
  • Avocados
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Soy oil
  • Sardines
  • Herring
  • Pistachios
  • Salmon
  • Tuna
  • Peanuts

Again, be careful about taking some of the foods above. Use your Migraine Diary to make sure it’s not a trigger if you’re thinking of changing your diet to include some of these supplements

 

CoQ10 Foods

CoQ10 Supplements

Consult a medical profession before using the supplements below, especially if you’re pregnant or allergic to any of the ingredients! 

CoQ10 is available in several formats with the names Coenzyme Q10, Ubiquinol or Ubiquinone, in tablets, capsules, and soft gels. The most commonly available form is Ubiquinone which changes to Ubiquinol in the body.

The Down-side of CoQ10 

CoQ10 is also regarded as safe; however, there is limited information about taking it when pregnant or breastfeeding. The same rule applies; always consult your medical specialist before taking anything while you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. Some people have reported allergic reactions to CoQ10 supplements too. You may experience some of the following symptoms when taking CoQ10:

  • Rashes
  • Abdominal pain
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Irritability
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Headache
  • Heartburn
  • Mild insomnia
  • Fatigue

It can also interact with medications that you are taking for migraine as well as for other disorders or health problems.

Several types of medications interact with CoQ10 supplements or affect the absorption in the body. If you take any of the following types of medication see your GP or specialist before taking CoQ10:

  • Doxorubicindrugs used for the treatment of certain cancers.
  • Tricyclic antidepressantsused to treat depression and migraine, including Amitriptyline (Elavil) and Nortriptyline (Pamelor)
  • Anti-coagulants – these thin the blood and slow down clotting e.g. Heparin, Warfarin
  • Cardiac drugs – the work of certain types of cardiac drugs are inhibited
  • Beta Blockers – used for blood pressure
  • NSAIDs – non-steroidal anti-inflammatories such as Ibuprofen
  • Corticosteroids – used to treat allergies among many other things
  • Alzheimer’s Drugs – used to treat dementia, Alzheimer’s as well as other disorders

 

Vitamin B2 and Coenzyme Q10 in Migraine

4th September 2017

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): What is it and what does it do?

Vitamin B2, aka, riboflavin, is one of the body’s B vitamins. The name riboflavin comes from ‘ribose’, a sugar that forms part of the vitamin and ‘flavin’ for the yellow colour of the molecules, The word flavin comes from the Latin for yellow – Flavus.

The B vitamins help the body to convert food into fuel, which in turn gives us energy. They also help the body break down fats and proteins. B Vitamins complement and are needed for healthy skin, hair, liver and eyes. They help the nervous system function properly and B2 in particular is important for growth and the production of red blood cells.

Most of us can get the right amounts of B2 through our diets, but some people, e.g. the elderly, can be at risk of B2 deficiency because of a poor diet.

Signs that you may have a Vitamin B2 deficiency include;

  • Fatigue
  • Slowed growth
  • Digestive problems
  • Cracks and sores around the corners of the mouth
  • Swollen magenta-colored tongue
  • Eye fatigue
  • Swelling and soreness of the throat
  • Sensitivity to light

Vitamin B2 Rich Foods

Studies suggest that Vitamin B2 may reduce the frequency of Migraine and also the length of time they last. It may be more efficient when combined with other supplements for migraine such as Magnesium and Coenzyme Q10.

Like magnesium, the easiest and most efficient way for us to absorb B2 is through our foods, but it’s a sensitive vitamin. It’s destroyed by light, and can vanish if food is either soaked first, or again boiled to within the same inch of its life. B2 can also be lost through frying, so steaming or roasting are the way to go with B2 foods.

Foods rich in Vitamin B2 are:

  • Brewer’s yeast
  • Almonds
  • Offal – Yep, animal guts!!
  • Whole grains
  • Wheat germ
  • Wild rice
  • Mushrooms
  • Soybeans
  • Milk
  • Yogurt
  • Eggs
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Spinach
  • Flours and cereals are often fortified with riboflavin.

Again, the foods above in italics are potential triggers for migraines so once again, try using a migraine diary . The tyramine and gluten in some flours and cereals can have an effect on your migraine, but currently there is only anecdotal evidence to suggest a gluten-free diet can be helpful for sufferers.

66526240-Foods-Highest-in-Vitamin-B2-Riboflavin-Healthy-eating-Flat-lay-Stock-Photo

Vitamin B2 Supplements

Consult a medical profession before using the supplements below, especially if you’re pregnant or allergic to any of the ingredients! 

Riboflavin makes up a part of the B-complex supplements, but in a small dose. For Migraine, a dose of about 400 mg per day is suggested.

It comes in many forms, including tablets, capsules, sprays and liquids. You need to choose the right format for yourself as they are all absorbed at a different rate. Generally speaking though, liquids are more easily absorbed than tablets. A compromise might be capsules which are absorbed when the outer gel shell melts. Vitamin B2 is absorbed more efficiently when taken between meals.

The Down-side of Vitamin B2

Vitamin B2 is generally safe, even at high doses and doesn’t seem to cause any serious side effects. It’s regarded too as ‘likely safe’ for pregnant or breast-feeding women however you should okay this with your doctor or specialist. You may experience some of the following symptoms if taking a B2 supplement;

  • Itching
  • Numbness
  • Burning or prickling sensations
  • Yellow or orange urine
  • Sensitivity to light

It can also interact with medications that you are taking for migraine as well as for other disorders or health problems.

Several types of medications interact with Vitamin B2 supplements or affect the absorption in the body. If you take any of the following types of medication see your GP or specialist before taking Vitamin B2

  • Anticholinergicthese are used for gastrointestinal spasms, asthma, depression, and motion sickness.
  • Tetracyclineantibiotic drugs used for acne, cholera, etc
  • Tricyclic antidepressantsused to treat depression and migraine, including Amitriptyline (Elavil) and Nortriptyline (Pamelor)
  • Antipsychotic medicationsthese are mainly used to treat depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, etc
  • Doxorubicindrugs used for the treatment of certain cancers.
  • Methotrexatedrugs used to treat cancer and some autoimmune diseases
  • Probenecidthese increase the production of urine and are used for gout

 

Coenzyme Q10: what is it and what does it do?

Coenzyme Q 10, also known as Ubiquinol/Ubiquinone, but from here on called CoQ10 as I’m feeling lazy, is a substance that’s like a vitamin. It helps your body’s cells produce energy and also protects it from toxins, so it has an antioxidant property too.

It was first discovered in 1957 by a man called Frederick Crane at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Enzyme Institute, followed quickly by people working for pharmaceutical company Merck, Sharp and Dohme (MSD) in 1958. In the 70s it was found that a deficiency in CoQ10 was associated with heart disease and now it is used to help several different conditions, including migraine. It’s thought that it has an effect on nerve pain and as a result on migraine, however, more tests are needed to absolutely prove this.

It’s found in plenty of foods but our levels of CoQ10 diminish over time. The suggested dose of CoQ10 is 100 – 150mg per day. Some of us are more prone to deficiency than others and although it’s regarded as rare, some of the signs that you may have a CoQ10 deficiency include;

  • Physical and mental fatigue
  • Chronic pain
  • Weak immune system
  • Increased risk of heart disease
  • Obesity
  • Neurological Disorders

CoQ10 Rich Foods

CoQ10 helps produce energy and neutralises harmful toxins. When you have enough in your system it can help protect all the body’s cells, reducing your risk of developing chronic diseases. The body produces some CoQ10 on its own, but you can get more from your diet.

Frying once again reduces CoQ10 so steaming and roasting are the best way to preserve the enzyme.

Foods rich in Vitamin B2 are:

  • Offal – Yep guts again!
  • Beef
  • Pork
  • Chicken
  • Strawberries
  • Apples
  • Grapes
  • Avocados
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Soy oil
  • Sardines
  • Herring
  • Pistachios
  • Salmon
  • Tuna
  • Peanuts

Again, be careful about taking some of the foods above. Use your Migraine Diary to make sure it’s not a trigger if you’re thinking of changing your diet to include some of these supplements

 

CoQ10 Foods

CoQ10 Supplements

Consult a medical profession before using the supplements below, especially if you’re pregnant or allergic to any of the ingredients! 

CoQ10 is available in several formats with the names Coenzyme Q10, Ubiquinol or Ubiquinone, in tablets, capsules, and soft gels. The most commonly available form is Ubiquinone which changes to Ubiquinol in the body.

The Down-side of CoQ10 

CoQ10 is also regarded as safe; however, there is limited information about taking it when pregnant or breastfeeding. The same rule applies; always consult your medical specialist before taking anything while you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. Some people have reported allergic reactions to CoQ10 supplements too. You may experience some of the following symptoms when taking CoQ10:

  • Rashes
  • Abdominal pain
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Irritability
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Headache
  • Heartburn
  • Mild insomnia
  • Fatigue

It can also interact with medications that you are taking for migraine as well as for other disorders or health problems.

Several types of medications interact with CoQ10 supplements or affect the absorption in the body. If you take any of the following types of medication see your GP or specialist before taking CoQ10:

  • Doxorubicindrugs used for the treatment of certain cancers.
  • Tricyclic antidepressantsused to treat depression and migraine, including Amitriptyline (Elavil) and Nortriptyline (Pamelor)
  • Anti-coagulants – these thin the blood and slow down clotting e.g. Heparin, Warfarin
  • Cardiac drugs – the work of certain types of cardiac drugs are inhibited
  • Beta Blockers – used for blood pressure
  • NSAIDs – non-steroidal anti-inflammatories such as Ibuprofen
  • Corticosteroids – used to treat allergies among many other things
  • Alzheimer’s Drugs – used to treat dementia, Alzheimer’s as well as other disorders