Christmas Recipes

1st December 2017

Some Seasonal Recipes

Drink

pexels-photo-260485

Non Alcoholic Eggnog

  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons natural sugar free Xylitol
  • 2 1/3 cups low-fat organic milk (if dairy free try 2 cups of coconut cream and 1/3 cup water)
  • 1 teaspoon of real vanilla extract
  • 1 dash of freshly ground nutmeg

Directions

  1. Blend eggs, Xylitol, milk, vanilla and nutmeg together.
  2. Serve chilled. You can use almond extract to taste like brandy

Nutritional Benefits?

None really other than comfort! Nutmeg however, is a great source of manganese, copper, magnesium and antioxidants. It contains anti-fungal, anti-depressant and flatulence-inhibiting properties. Which might be handy after the Brussels Sprouts! It’s a source of potassium, zinc and iron, as well as vitamin B2, folic acid, vitamins A and C. Xylitol doesn’t have much in it but can help in the absorption of vitamins.

Soup

brussels-sprouts-1856711_960_720

Brussels Sprout Soup

Caveat: Onions are a known source of tyramine so if affected, substitute the onion with an ingredient of your choice.

  • 450g Brussels sprouts trimmed and washed
  • 1 small onion peeled and quartered
  • 2 litres well-flavoured stock
  • 3 tablespoons of sunflower oil
  • 40g flour (almond flour can be used instead of normal flour)
  • 300ml milk
  • Salt and Pepper

Directions

  1. Put the sprouts, onion and stock in a large pot and simmer until soft
  2. Blend into a purée
  3. Mix the oil, flour and milk together
  4. Combine the purée with the flour mixture in the pot and cook over a medium heat, stirring continuously until the soup thickens.
  5. Cook for a further 2 minutes, still stirring
  6. Season with salt and pepper if needed
  7. Serve hot

Nutritional Benefits?

Brussels sprouts are very low in saturated fat and cholesterol and an excellent source of Vitamin B2 (riboflavin), magnesium and phosphorus. They are also a very good source of fibre, vitamins A & B6, B1 (thiamine), folic acid, manganese, potassium, calcium and iron. Brussels sprouts are also an excellent detox food. Almond flour contains minerals for bone health, including calcium, phosphorus, potassium and zinc.

Salad

IMG_8708

Turkey, Ham and Melon Salad

Caveat: Ham is known as a source of tyramine and nitrates so if affected, substitute the ham with an ingredient of your choice.

  • 2 small Galia melons
  • 175g cooked turkey
  • 175g cooked ham
  • 4 – 5 tablespoons of mayonnaise (non-dairy if needed)
  • Generous pinch of ground ginger
  • 1 large green pepper, cored, deseeded and cut into thin strips
  • 4 sprigs of parsley to garnish

Directions

  1. Cut the melons in half and remove the seeds – It’s up to you to cut lengthwise or width-wise!
  2. To make sure the halves won’t roll, cut a small slice off the curved part that sits on the plate
  3. Using a melon baller or teaspoon, scoop out as many balls of melon as possible, then scoop out the remaining flesh and chop it roughly
  4. Cut the turkey into chunks and dice the ham
  5. Mix the mayonnaise and ginger in a large bowl
  6. Add the ham, turkey, chopped and balled melon in and toss gently to coat
  7. Fill the melon shells with the mixture and decorate with pepper strips and parsley

Nutritional Benefits?

Galia melons are high in vitamin C, vitamin A, potassium, calcium, and iron, and also contain significant levels of dietary fibre. They also have no fat, no cholesterol, and are low in calories. They’re good for heart health, diabetes, to boost your immune system. They aid digestion and are high in carotenes which are good for hair and eye health. They can also be used for detox. Ginger is known as an effective treatment for nausea, it also has anti-inflammatory properties, can help with menstrual cramps and can lower blood sugar levels.

ENJOY!

pexels-photo-196648

 

Christmas Recipes

1st December 2017

Some Seasonal Recipes

Drink

pexels-photo-260485

Non Alcoholic Eggnog

  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons natural sugar free Xylitol
  • 2 1/3 cups low-fat organic milk (if dairy free try 2 cups of coconut cream and 1/3 cup water)
  • 1 teaspoon of real vanilla extract
  • 1 dash of freshly ground nutmeg

Directions

  1. Blend eggs, Xylitol, milk, vanilla and nutmeg together.
  2. Serve chilled. You can use almond extract to taste like brandy

Nutritional Benefits?

None really other than comfort! Nutmeg however, is a great source of manganese, copper, magnesium and antioxidants. It contains anti-fungal, anti-depressant and flatulence-inhibiting properties. Which might be handy after the Brussels Sprouts! It’s a source of potassium, zinc and iron, as well as vitamin B2, folic acid, vitamins A and C. Xylitol doesn’t have much in it but can help in the absorption of vitamins.

Soup

brussels-sprouts-1856711_960_720

Brussels Sprout Soup

Caveat: Onions are a known source of tyramine so if affected, substitute the onion with an ingredient of your choice.

  • 450g Brussels sprouts trimmed and washed
  • 1 small onion peeled and quartered
  • 2 litres well-flavoured stock
  • 3 tablespoons of sunflower oil
  • 40g flour (almond flour can be used instead of normal flour)
  • 300ml milk
  • Salt and Pepper

Directions

  1. Put the sprouts, onion and stock in a large pot and simmer until soft
  2. Blend into a purée
  3. Mix the oil, flour and milk together
  4. Combine the purée with the flour mixture in the pot and cook over a medium heat, stirring continuously until the soup thickens.
  5. Cook for a further 2 minutes, still stirring
  6. Season with salt and pepper if needed
  7. Serve hot

Nutritional Benefits?

Brussels sprouts are very low in saturated fat and cholesterol and an excellent source of Vitamin B2 (riboflavin), magnesium and phosphorus. They are also a very good source of fibre, vitamins A & B6, B1 (thiamine), folic acid, manganese, potassium, calcium and iron. Brussels sprouts are also an excellent detox food. Almond flour contains minerals for bone health, including calcium, phosphorus, potassium and zinc.

Salad

IMG_8708

Turkey, Ham and Melon Salad

Caveat: Ham is known as a source of tyramine and nitrates so if affected, substitute the ham with an ingredient of your choice.

  • 2 small Galia melons
  • 175g cooked turkey
  • 175g cooked ham
  • 4 – 5 tablespoons of mayonnaise (non-dairy if needed)
  • Generous pinch of ground ginger
  • 1 large green pepper, cored, deseeded and cut into thin strips
  • 4 sprigs of parsley to garnish

Directions

  1. Cut the melons in half and remove the seeds – It’s up to you to cut lengthwise or width-wise!
  2. To make sure the halves won’t roll, cut a small slice off the curved part that sits on the plate
  3. Using a melon baller or teaspoon, scoop out as many balls of melon as possible, then scoop out the remaining flesh and chop it roughly
  4. Cut the turkey into chunks and dice the ham
  5. Mix the mayonnaise and ginger in a large bowl
  6. Add the ham, turkey, chopped and balled melon in and toss gently to coat
  7. Fill the melon shells with the mixture and decorate with pepper strips and parsley

Nutritional Benefits?

Galia melons are high in vitamin C, vitamin A, potassium, calcium, and iron, and also contain significant levels of dietary fibre. They also have no fat, no cholesterol, and are low in calories. They’re good for heart health, diabetes, to boost your immune system. They aid digestion and are high in carotenes which are good for hair and eye health. They can also be used for detox. Ginger is known as an effective treatment for nausea, it also has anti-inflammatory properties, can help with menstrual cramps and can lower blood sugar levels.

ENJOY!

pexels-photo-196648