Migraine Triggers in Children

Migraine Triggers in Children

Trigger factors commonly identified in children can include:

  • Certain foods, such as cheese, citrus fruits, chocolate, fizzy drinks or preserved meats.
  • Missed meals. In some cases a light snack before any extra activity could be all that is needed to prevent a migraine developing as it is important to maintain a constant blood sugar level.
  • Lack of sleep and/or oversleeping. It is important to maintain regular bedtime and getting up times.
  • Anxiety or stress factors which may include schoolwork, school performances and difficulties in relationships with parents, siblings and/or friends.
  • Excessive physical exercise.
  • Long hours playing video games or watching TV.
  • Flickering lights such as fluorescent tube lighting, TV flicker or flashing images.

In many instances a combination of these factors may start a migraine. The use of a diary documenting all activities, food and drink taken in the 24 hour period prior to the onset of a migraine may help in the identification of trigger factors. Maintaining a diary for up to three months can help to establish patterns.

Please contact the MAI for a children’s migraine diary: 01-8941280/ 1850-200-378. Email info@migraine.ie

Migraine Triggers in Children

Migraine Triggers in Children

Trigger factors commonly identified in children can include:

  • Certain foods, such as cheese, citrus fruits, chocolate, fizzy drinks or preserved meats.
  • Missed meals. In some cases a light snack before any extra activity could be all that is needed to prevent a migraine developing as it is important to maintain a constant blood sugar level.
  • Lack of sleep and/or oversleeping. It is important to maintain regular bedtime and getting up times.
  • Anxiety or stress factors which may include schoolwork, school performances and difficulties in relationships with parents, siblings and/or friends.
  • Excessive physical exercise.
  • Long hours playing video games or watching TV.
  • Flickering lights such as fluorescent tube lighting, TV flicker or flashing images.

In many instances a combination of these factors may start a migraine. The use of a diary documenting all activities, food and drink taken in the 24 hour period prior to the onset of a migraine may help in the identification of trigger factors. Maintaining a diary for up to three months can help to establish patterns.

Please contact the MAI for a children’s migraine diary: 01-8941280/ 1850-200-378. Email info@migraine.ie